Resources to Start Difficult Conversations about Race

Historically underrepresented communities often face additional stressors that we know impact children’s mental health. Whether you are from a racially or ethnically diverse background or someone looking to be an ally, these resources give you the tools to talk to children about race, immigration, discrimination, inclusivity, and ways to support diverse children’s mental health.


We know, now more than ever, this is an important conversation to have. And one we need to continue.



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ARTICLES AND SUPPORT
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Tips for Self-Care for Black Families

Racism places a tremendous burden on all Americans, but especially Black Americans who are disproportionately affected by unequal systems in our society. For adults and especially children, it is important to find ways to cope with this burden.

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Article

Obstacles Latinx Children Face and How to Help

Latinx children show higher rates of mental illness and suicidal thoughts than other children their age. On Our Sleeves helps you understand why they are more likely to be impacted and how parents and caregivers can help.

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Article

How to Teach Kids About Microaggressions

On Our Sleeves has tips for parents and teachers to teach kids about microaggressions; every day subtle, intentional or unintentional interactions or behaviors that communicate some sort of bias toward historically marginalized groups.

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Video

Kids and Race-Related Violence

Learn how your children might respond to these events based on their age group as well as the best ways to offer support and guidance.

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ARTICLES AND SUPPORT
Ariana Hoet

How to Find a Culturally Informed Therapist

If you are BIPOC or LGBTQIA+, it may be hard to find a therapist who identifies in the same way as you or your child. We have some tips to help you find a culturally informed therapist for your child.

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Article

Protecting Kids Against Racism

Children are often excluded, bullied, treated unfairly, or discriminated against because of their racial or ethnic background. That’s why it is important to help children develop a strong identity that embraces your family’s ethnicity and culture.

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ARTICLE

Welcoming Immigrants and Refugees

Our experts have ways you can help immigrants and refugees make their transition to your community easier.

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Article

Talking to Kids About Racism

If you are unsure how to start the conversation with your kids, use these resources to help guide you – from setting an example to asking the right questions.

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Article

Supporting Immigrant Children's Mental Health

Children born in the US from immigrant parents, or those who arrived at an early age, actually show worse mental and physical health outcomes than those currently immigrating. This is called the immigrant paradox.


July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

We know that mental health concerns do not discriminate - mental health affects all races, identities and genders. Help On Our Sleeves to start conversations by sharing the infographics below - because no one should feel shame or stigma when discussing their child's mental health.


The suicide rate for Black children ages 5 to 11 has nearly doubled. On Our Sleeves.

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Suicide attempts for Hispanic girls, grades 9-12, were 40% higher than for non-Hispanic white girls in the same group, in 2017. On Our Sleeves. The Movement for Children's Mental Health.

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Children of Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) descent are about as likely to experience mental health problems as the general population, but only half as likely to seek mental health services. On Our Sleeves. The movement for children's mental health.

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